The hollow Earth of the Macuxies

I have read the article "The Underworld of the Macuxi", Thursday, August 9, 2012 21:52, http://beforeitsnews. com/strange/2012/08/the- underworld-of-the-macuxi- 2442478.html

I do not know who wrote that article.

After searching long and hard I found this Yahoo group as maybe the earliest publication of the article. ALLPLANETS-HOLLOW

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ALLPLANETS-HOLLOW
The goal of our list is to promote discussion and awareness of the Hollow Earth Theory in general, and certainly in relation to legend such as Puranic and ...

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Is this your translation, majdca?

It appears to have been translated from the Spanish. Who was the original Spanish author?

I also found a very similar article.

I have rewritten both articles a bit to get it as one tale. I would like permission from the copyright holder(s) to publish the excerpts / or most of their tale in my e-book Aeneid Liber Sextus.

Yours Faithfully,

Dirk Bontes

Dirk Bontes,

I received a copy in Spanish about ten years ago from Dennis Crenshaw. I translated it, and as I mentioned, my translation is here:

The Subterranean World of the Macuxies

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The Subterranean World of the Macuxies
The Subterranean World of the Macuxies

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Dennis might have some information on the original writer.

Posted by Dean

Thank you, Dean. I have mostly used majdca's translation posted in the first post (and elsewhere). May I have your permission to publish your translation (or excerpts of it) in my book? I do not know whether I will use it.

I managed to track down the original author of the Macuxi tale. He provided me with a Spanish text, which I translated into Dutch and into Spanish, and he gave me permission to publish that text.

Several years ago I had translated the sixth book of the Aeneid from the Latin into Dutch and English and published those translations as e-books. The English title of my e-book is "Aeneid Liber Sextus" - by Dirk Bontes. (Nobody bought them, so I am still dirt poor.) http://iturl.nl/snWdY

This book describes the voyage to and travel through the Underworld by the Trojan hero Aeneas. In my interpretation and translation of the text the Underworld was (and is) a huge space habitat and Aeneas went there by means of a spaceshuttle.

In my interpretation Aeneas returned to Earth by means of a stargate. It is by means of such stargates, which used to be hidden in the depths of the Earth at various locations, that people might get access to the space habitat of the Underworld. The Hollow Earth is a hollow space habitat - but it is not in the Earth, but in space. It is only its stargate accesses that are or were hidden in the depths of the Earth.

In my - revolutionary - translation in brief comments I deduce the technological features in the Underworld as described and implied by the Latin text.

When I happened to read the Macuxi tale, I was struck by the many agreements with the Underworld as described by me in Aeneid Liber Sextus. Having been given permission to publish the Macuxi tale by the original author, I added it as an additional chapter to Aeneid Liber Sextus and uploaded the new update of this e-book to my Internet publisher Smashwords on 25 October 2015.

I have since also written about the Underworld of the Green Children of Woolpit in my e-book about Zwarte Piet, but that latter e-book is in Dutch only; except for one chapter about highwayman Dick Turpin, and one chapter about Australian Bushrangers - both of which I translated into English and published as independent e-books; they also have a bit about the Underworld.

I have corresponded with a couple of people from this group when I became a member in September. It occurred to me today that I ought to report back to them. Hence this post.

Link not working. Where are your books?

···

On Tue, Dec 1, 2015 at 4:44 AM, [email protected] [ALLPLANETS-HOLLOW] [email protected] wrote:

I managed to track down the original author of the Macuxi tale. He provided me with a Spanish text, which I translated into Dutch and into Spanish, and he gave me permission to publish that text.

Several years ago I had translated the sixth book of the Aeneid from the Latin into Dutch and English and published those translations as e-books. The English title of my e-book is "Aeneid Liber Sextus" - by Dirk Bontes. (Nobody bought them, so I am still dirt poor.) http://iturl.nl/snWdY

This book describes the voyage to and travel through the Underworld by the Trojan hero Aeneas. In my interpretation and translation of the text the Underworld was (and is) a huge space habitat and Aeneas went there by means of a spaceshuttle.

In my interpretation Aeneas returned to Earth by means of a stargate. It is by means of such stargates, which used to be hidden in the depths of the Earth at various locations, that people might get access to the space habitat of the Underworld. The Hollow Earth is a hollow space habitat - but it is not in the Earth, but in space. It is only its stargate accesses that are or were hidden in the depths of the Earth.

In my - revolutionary - translation in brief comments I deduce the technological features in the Underworld as described and implied by the Latin text.

When I happened to read the Macuxi tale, I was struck by the many agreements with the Underworld as described by me in Aeneid Liber Sextus. Having been given permission to publish the Macuxi tale by the original author, I added it as an additional chapter to Aeneid Liber Sextus and uploaded the new update of this e-book to my Internet publisher Smashwords on 25 October 2015.

I have since also written about the Underworld of the Green Children of Woolpit in my e-book about Zwarte Piet, but that latter e-book is in Dutch only; except for one chapter about highwayman Dick Turpin, and one chapter about Australian Bushrangers - both of which I translated into English and published as independent e-books; they also have a bit about the Underworld.

I have corresponded with a couple of people from this group when I became a member in September. It occurred to me today that I ought to report back to them. Hence this post.

The link works just fine.

@archim_newton how can i talk to you?
Regards

Having this old message from Dirk Bontes brought back up proved to be interesting.

It appears that Mr. Bontes has a couple of ways of being reached, and has other books:
https://www.smashwords.com/profile/view/DirkBontes

Twitter: @DirkBontes1
Facebook: Facebook profile

I found a review in Dutch of his book here:

I translated it via Google Translate:
https://translate.google.com/translate?sl=nl&tl=en&u=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.smashwords.com%2Fbooks%2Fview%2F387161

The English translation of the review says:

Aeneid Liber Sextus

Surprising view of the journey of Aeneas

Dirk Bontes wrote a translation and commentary on one of the most famous epics from the Greco-Roman civilization, part VI of the Aeneid. It is a book that can confuse you, but also gives you many insights into the history and development of modern man.
I have read the story with great amazement, and it should be noted that I did not learn Latin in high school for more than 3 years and so I could hardly read the Latin text of Virgil. For the comparison I have to do with the translations.

Dirk Bontes is known in a relatively small circle as a writer, translator, organizer and jury member of fantasy story contests, such as the Paul Harland Prize and Fantastels.
Until this year, he organized the Trek Sagae story contest.
In addition, he has his own view of Zwarte Piet and now also of the Aeneid.
He himself compares the publication of the book with "nailing my rebellious doctrines to the doors of the classicists' church."

The Aeneid is about the legend of Aeneas, a mythological Trojan hero. He was the son of the mortal Anchises and of the pagan goddess Aphrodite.
The work consists of 12 “hymns” that describe Aeneas from Troy to Latium. His father Anchises had died in Sicilia.
In a dream, the shadow of his father appeared to Aeneas. He invited him to visit him in the underworld if he had come to Italia.
The sixth chant of the Aeneid describes his journey to and through the underworld together with his leader Sibylle, the meeting with his father, his prediction about the glorious future of his descendants and his return, together with his leader, to the overworld.

After a negative review (and a reaction to this), an introduction and an account follows. Reading the introduction is very important if you want to understand the translation and comments.
Bontes does not see mythologies as fictional stories. The gods in Greek, Roman, Scandinavian and Native American mythology had different names, but they were the same persons.
The representations of Hell in Christian Cultures are largely based on the representations of the underworld by Aeneas. The term Hel comes from Asgardian mythology, Helheimr, the realm of the dead.

Bontes' translation follows the Latin text of Virgil, but he gives a completely different interpretation of Aeneas's journey. It is about a journey that really took place and an underworld that really existed. The underworld was not a location in the Earth, but under the Earth, that is, a habitat in space.
His leader Sibylle is a cyborg, she speaks with the voice of Phoebus (Apollo).
The golden branch that must give access to the underworld is growing again through nuclear fusion. The journey to the underworld is made by space shuttle where a space station gives access to the space habitat, the Orcus.

Ferryman Charon, who oversees the flows of the Acheron (a sewage treatment plant), is pitch black and his eyes are like two glowing coals. The underworld was brightly lit in ultraviolet light.

He reaches the Elysium, where he meets his father Anchises who tells him about the great future of his descendants, but that he will first have to fight a fierce battle.
Then his father takes Aeneas and Sibylle to the two gates of the night, one of horn and one of ivory. They are stargates that are in use night and night.
Anchises sends him through the ivory gate. Aeneas returns to the ships and sees his companions again.

Has Dirk Bontes succeeded in getting reactions from classicists, but also linguists and philologists? Certainly not. He himself says that the few of the general public who have read, or at least started, the book found the book to be too difficult and inscrutable.
I find the book difficult indeed, but certainly not inscrutable. There is a clear line in it, but it also raises questions such as what happened to the space habitat, when was the “first interstellar human civilization” established and what was it before?
The arguments he puts forward are not convincing. I don't see the work as historical writing, but as fiction. It cannot be proven whether the underworld - the space habitat - actually existed. But the existence of this habitat cannot be falsified either. I see mythologies as fictional stories, often beautiful stories, but nevertheless stories.

After some 665 lines, Bontes takes a few side paths with page-long comments that can be very confusing to the reader, about the five major personality traits, about the Inca, the Oera Linda book, and about evolution. He then tends to want to explain too much.
This is more often the case between different pieces of translation and commentary. Readers may drop out here.
Interesting is the concept of “magic paradigm”. There are several concepts in the book with an identical name, such as Acheron, Tartarus, Styx, Cocytus and the Avernic pool.

After the translation and commentary on the Aeneid liber sextus, there is a chapter on the Macuxi Indians in the border region of Guyana, Brazil and Venezuela. This chapter is based on the work of Gabriel Silva. The Macuxi have a certain understanding of the underworld that is very similar to the space habitat as described in Dirk Bontes' book.
Dirk Bontes has received permission from Silva to include the translated text. I would recommend everyone to read this chapter.

The book starts with a negative review of an earlier version, with quite a few quotes taken from context, followed by a “review of the review”. But that is very confusing. These two pieces are best included at the end of the book or as an attachment.

Dirk Bontes has also made a simpler version of this work, Aeneas and the Sibylle.
In this version, the line numbers from the extended version are missing, but this version is
suitable as a good introduction. It is an edited translation, the information, comments and linguistic analyzes are included in the text of the translation.
The extended version is really better, but if you can no longer see the forest through the trees, you can go to the simpler version and maybe then again to the extended version.

This does seem quite interesting, but I believe I would interpret a number of things differently - yet perhaps still see this work as factual as does Bontes. It sounds that perhaps Dante Alighieri's Divine Comedy really needs to be brought into the circle of consideration here as well (along with all other ancient considerations). This would make a phenomenal deep study.

Hi Soretna,

Thank you for your interest.

It has been years since I logged into this e-mail account, so I read your e-mail only just now.

My translation of the sixth book of the Aeneid is an interpretation. It cost me a year full time to translate it - and more. And at the time I felt satisfied.

The past year I and a friend have been reading the books 1-5 and I expect that in about a month we will read the sixth book again. I may then write another interpretation of that sixth book.

One of my recent insights is that Aeneas' father Anchises was Halley's Comet and since his mother was Aphrodite = the planet Venus, I now strongly doubt that Aeneas was a living organism. I am rather convinced now, that Aeneas was a subsequent appearance of Halley's Comet.

Translations are dependent upon the perception of the translator, so this new insight may cause profound changes in a new translation.

Sincerely,
Dirk Bontes

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Oh, and those Twitter and Facebook accounts are no longer valid, Soretna.

Dirk

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@archim_newton thanks for replying here! Love your work and keen to hear updates and new information / translations from you. It is wonderful to have thinkers such as yourself - and is the purpose of MindReach.net generally - to discuss such topics and share insights based on deep and careful considerations.

So we can essentially find all of your works on SmashWords.com right?:
Smashwords – About Dirk Bontes, author of 'The Secret Identities Of John Wilkes Booth', 'De Geheime Identiteiten Van John Wilkes Booth', 'Catullus 2 & 3', etc.

@Sebastian please notice this reply and how you may now get in touch with Mr. Bontes.